Legal aspects and best practices of open-source

On April 19-20 Fraunhofer IPA hosted an event organized in collaboration with euRobotics AISBL on the best practices and legal aspects of Open-Source Software (OSS) in robotics and automation. The rationale behind the event was that while OSS is an established and accepted factor in "software-heavy" business domains like enterprise IT systems and smartphones, its inner workings are less understood in industries where software in now shifting from a component with ancillary role to one with high added-value. With the changes poised to happen in industrial robotics and automation by the advances in robotics science on one hand (just think of the progress in autonomous driving and its underpinning achievements in perception, planning, control) and by government-mandated initiatives like Industrie4.0 on the other, the ROS-Industrial team believes that OSS is a great opportunity to accelerate this process. However, to foster its adoption we understandably need to identify and clear also non-technical obstacles such as possible legal, economic and regulatory aspects.

During the event the speakers described to the audience how OSS is already part of established business practices at large companies in the industrial domain; how digital economies are being shaped thanks also to OSS; which regulatory and legal aspects we need to take into account in terms of safety standards, licensing and compliance processes.

Takeaway messages that we want to highlight as they are instrumental in removing unfounded but long-standing critiques of OSS for industrial robots and machinery are:

  • the kind of functionalities that ROS is typically used for, and which sit at the OS/middleware and the application software levels, can be carried out by non-certified software as they live in a "sandbox" protected by the underlying safety-compliant foundation and which includes the electrical/mechanical and safety device/PLC level layers. As I like to say, we do not necessarily aim to replace the software in your robot's control box with ROS (although the software to do that is available), but rather to provide higher-level functionalities like perception-driven, online trajectory generation to let the robot operate in dynamic environments, thing not possible (or very difficult to perform) with the limited sets of preprogrammed motions typical of current automation
  • OSS has a long history of adoption in industrial automation; Linux (especially Linux RT) is a good example of this, and shows that using OSS in commercial products is not only possible, but also beneficial
  • having a compliance process in place (e.g. OpenChain) can ensure that licensing matters are properly dealt with

Given the interest and the feedback collected after the event, we plan on following-up on these topics at the ROS-Industrial Conference next fall, whose program will be made available in the coming weeks.

Things I Learned at OSCon 2016

Last week I had the pleasure of attending OSCon held in Austin, TX. OSCon has been around since 1999 and is a great conference for all things open source. More information on the conference can be found here. Overall the conference was educational and extremely motivational. I intend to regularly attend OSCon and I would recommend it to my colleagues in the open source robotics community. Below are things I learned from OSCon

  • A Historical Perspective
    Open source is not a new idea. According to wikipedia the idea of open source was hatched in the late 1990s. Before open source, there was free software which originated in the 1970s and 80s. For many of us, this history is unknown. We just accept that open source has been adopted by industry, but lack an appreciation for what it took to get it there. Danese Cooper's talk provided a great perspective on this history. The early trailblazers in the open source and free software movements deserve our admiration and respect. This historical perspective is also reassuring to those of us in the Industrial market. We are fighting some of the same battles that were fought early on in the IT market. While ROS-Industrial enjoys the support of the ROS-Industrial Consortium, there are still many industrial companies that remain unconvinced or unsupportive. The acceptance, and some might say dominance of open source in the IT market, illustrates what is possible when early adopters are relentless. It's also much easier when we can point to examples in the IT space, where open source has had a tremendous impact. I can't imagine the hurdles open source encountered in the early days. Imagine convincing businesses, who valued software so greatly, that giving it away is better for the common good and the bottom line. A sincere thank you to those who blazed the trail before us.
  • Building an Open Source Community
    The "Optimizing your project for contribution" presentation by Josh Matthews was perhaps the single most important presentation for me. Josh outlined 5 steps to build your community and make it easier for developers to contribute. These five steps are:
    1. Prioritizing useful information - Document your software and the contribution process from the point of view of a "newbie".
    2. Reducing friction - Make it easy to contribute. Don't make people jump through hoops unnecessarily.
    3. Making expectations clear - Set the expectations for not only contributions, but the review process in general. Provide a timeline for acceptance.
    4. Responding appropriately - Acknowledge every contribution. Contributions take time, and we should consider this when critiquing or requesting changes.
    5. Following through - Follow your own process. Deadlines in particular are of utmost importance. Responding to contributions immediately significantly increases the likelihood of follow on contributions (which ensures your community will grow).
      In the month's to come we will be implementing these ideas in ROS-Industrial. Great things are coming...
  • Open Source Participation is Still Hard for Companies
    While use of open source software has largely been accepted by companies, participation is still difficult. Participation includes everything from financial support to actively committing source code and interacting with the community. Financial support, as we have found with ROS-Industrial is probably the easiest form of support. While financial support is appreciated, and certainly needed, the greatest value of open source is only realized by participating. Participation has several hurdles, not the least of which are legal and IP related. Companies need processes in place to manage open source contributions. The processes need to protect the company while minimizing hurdles to contributing. How do companies create this processes...in the open of course. The TODO group, which stands for "Talk openly, develop openly" was organized for companies to cooperatively develop practices for contributing to open source and sharing experiences.
  • Community Leadership Summit
    This summit is held before OSCon. One of the reasons I attend OSCon was to get ideas for how to lead and grow the ROS-Industrial community. Just about everyone I talked to recommended I attend the Community Leadership Summit. The summit is always held before OSCon. It brings together community leaders across the open source world to discuss strategies for building communities. I won't miss this next year.
  • Thank You Lawyers
    I attended several presentations on the legal aspects of open source. We owe a debt of gratitude to lawyers at the OSI, Apache Foundation, and others for ensuring the open source software will remain open and protected from legal claims. They have ensured that the idea of open source and the true intent of developers is protected.

Upcoming ROS-I Events

Save the date for these upcoming events! For more details, refer to the events page.

  • 31 May, 10 AM Central, ROS-I Roadmapping (RIC Members): ROS-I Consortium members and/or ROS-I package administrators, please attend the upcoming ROS-I roadmapping event on Tuesday, May 31, 2016. The virtual meeting will use Anymeeting. Keep an eye out for the invitation.
    • Hosts: Paul Hvass (SwRI) and Ron Brown (EWI)
    • Agenda: We will share the current state of the ROS-I roadmap and will discuss ideas for new enhancement proposals.

  • 14 June, 9 AM Central, ROS-I Community Meeting (Public, Registration Required): Join us for the next series of presentations and discussion about ROS-Industrial. Here is the agenda:
    • Host: Paul Hvass, SwRI
    • Agenda:
    • Initiative to Create a PackML State Machine Library for ROS-I, Lex Tinker-Sackett, 3M
    • UT NRG Planned Code Release, Mitch Pryor, UT NRG
    • Multi-arm Control in MoveIt!, Dave Coleman, CU Corell Lab
    • Industrial CI, Issac Saito, TORK
    • Open Discussion
  • 14-15 July, 8:30 AM SGT, ROS-I Asia-Pacific Workshop (Public, Registration Required):
    • Hosts: Nicholas Yeo (*ASTAR ARTC), I-Ming Chen (NTU)
    • Agenda: ROS-I Asia Pacific Workshop will take place in Singapore between 14th and 15th of July. We are excited to bring the ROS-I workshop to Asia for the first time.
  • 21 August, ARIAC Competition Kickoff at CASE Conference (Open to Conference Attendees):
    • Host: Craig Schlenoff, NIST
    • Agenda: We invite you to attend the Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE), where we will have the official competition kickoff and workshop on Sunday, August 21.

Modbot at Hannover Messe 2016

Submitted by Saroya Whatley and Shawn Schaerer, Modbot

At Modbot, we make science fiction a reality by creating modular robotic parts that are easily snapped together to create a variety of robotic configurations servicing many different applications. By developing a system of modular joints and links that can be mass produced, Modbot is able to deliver industrial quality motion control at prices accessible by both larger manufacturing firms as well as makers and startups. The Modbot platform also includes a pendant software that can be accessed via the cloud or locally on a computer or tablet (Windows, OS X, iOS, Android). The software allows the user to not only program a Modbot robot with the touch of a button, but also simulate various robotic configurations in the virtual robot builder and build custom graphical user interfaces. The Modbot platform puts the power and precision of high-end machinery into an easy-to-assemble, simple to understand package.

Modbot Alpha Robot Demo at Hannover Messe 2016 (Photo: Shawn Schaerer)

Modbot Alpha Robot Demo at Hannover Messe 2016 (Photo: Shawn Schaerer)

The ROS-Industrial Consortium has been a valuable resource and feedback engine with regards to the development of Modbot's modular robotics system. As a member of the Consortium, Modbot works closely with the Consortium to use, develop and promote ROS Industrial. Currently, Modbot is working with the Consortium to release the CAD to ROS URDF Editor application.

Team Delft APC 2016 Progress

Team Delft has qualified as one of the 16 finalist teams for the Amazon Picking Challenge 2016. The team is a joint effort of the startup Delft Robotics (Kanter van Deurzen a.o.) and TU Delft Robotics Institute (Carlos Hernandez Corbato a.o.), supported by the RoboValley initiative (www.robovalley.com)

The goal of the Amazon challenge is “to strengthen the ties between the industrial and academic robotic communities and promote shared and open solutions to some of the big problems in unstructured automation." In order to spur the advancement of these fundamental technologies, there will be two parallel competitions: the Pick Task, and the Stow Task. For the Pick Task, target items for an Amazon order have to be removed from a standard shelf in Amazon warehouses and placed into a tote. The Stow Task requires the reverse: target items have to be taken from a tote and stowed into the bins of the shelf. These tasks involve challenges in object recognition, grasping, dexterous manipulation, and motion planning.

Since January, Team Delft has been developing an industrial grade robotic system for the challenge. It involves a 7 degree-of-freedom Motoman robot mounted on a rail, courtesy of Yaskawa (sponsor). Ensenso cameras from sponsor Imagining Development Systems will feed high quality 3D images to a vision pipeline for object recognition and localization using Deep Learning techniques. The team is fully committed to the ROS-Industrial initiative. ROS and ROS-Industrial components for motion planning, robot control, grasping, and PointCloud processing will be integrated into a fault-tolerant control architecture for the robot.

Application video of Team Delft to qualify as finalists for the Amazon Picking Challenge.

The Amazon Picking Challenge will be held in conjunction with RoboCup 2016 in Leipzig, Germany from June 30 to July 3, 2016.

Follow Team Delft at: @teamdelft_apc

For more information about the Amazon Picking Challenge, please visit http://amazonpickingchallenge.org/

Simulated Robot Agility Competition Update

Submission courtesy of William Harrison, NIST

This is a short update for those who have interest in participating in the International Agile Robotics for Industrial Automation Competition (ARIAC). Here are some things you should be aware of:

  • We invite you to attend the Conference on Automation Science and Engineering (CASE) (August 21-24), where we will have the official competition kickoff. All of the specific information about the conference will be presented at a full day workshop. We will have academic, industrial and government speakers the first part of the day. The second part of the day will be tutorials and training to give you the best jump start on learning the software and tools necessary for the competition.
  • If you can't make our workshop, we are holding a live webinar so you can still take advantage of the talks, training, and tutorials.
  • The actual competition is expected to be held in early 2017 in the cloud, so no travel is necessary.
  • Winners will be showcased at CASE 2017

If you are interested in Speaking at our workshop there are still spots available. Speakers who make it to CASE, will have the option of being listed as cosponsors of the competition. If you would like to speak or be involved in some other way please contact us.

Recap: ROS-I Training Spring 2016

Spring ROS-Industrial Basic Developers Training classes gave participants an opportunity to learn new skills through hands-on training. The ROS-Industrial Developers’ Training Class was held April 6 - 8, 2016 at SwRI, in San Antonio, Texas where the ROS-I Consortium Americas is based.

On April 6 the class reviewed ROS packages, parameters, topics, messages, launch files and URDF's. The first day ended with a tour of a SwRI labs and campus where the participants were able to see several ROS applications as well as get a better idea of Southwest Research Institute facilities. The rest of training took developers through foundational robot manipulation (with an introduction to Descartes and other path planners) and perception with a multi-option lab day. The lessons can be found here. Participants from 3M, ABB, Bastian, IDEXX, John Deere, JR Automation, Smart Robotics (Japan) and one student from the Make School attended. Check out the pictures (below).

Many thanks for Jonathan Meyer, Levi Armstrong, Shaun Edwards, and Christina Gomez from SwRI for this year's training.

students independently walking through an online exercise while jonathan clarifies a point

students independently walking through an online exercise while jonathan clarifies a point

all students bring their own laptops with a virtual machine that is set up and ready to go; levi approaches a student with a question

all students bring their own laptops with a virtual machine that is set up and ready to go; levi approaches a student with a question

The full class with  Swri ROS-Industrial support staff included

The full class with  Swri ROS-Industrial support staff included

Industrial Calibration Library Updates

The ROS-I Industrial Calibration Library is the result of an internally funded SwRI project and has the following capabilities:

  • Intrinsic camera calibration
  • Extrinsic 2D/3D sensor calibration for
    • Arrays of heterogeneous sensors
    • Sensor(s) on moving/non-moving frames
    • Coordination with robot motion
  • Accuracy field estimation

Check out two recent videos (below). The first is a short overview of the Industrial Calibration Library. It concludes with an invitation for others to use the library for their applications. Our second video is an example use case of extrinsic calibration between a robot and a David sensor, courtesy of Victor Lamoine from Institut Maupertuis. Let us know how you are using the Industrial Calibration Library!

Get the Legal and Economic Scoop for OSS in Robotics & Automation

As the technical value of Open-Source Software (OSS) is gaining acceptance in Industrial Robotics and Automation, our daily interaction with the key stakeholders operating in this field (OEMs, system integrators, startups, end users) has made us realize that the limiting factor to its further diffusion lies elsewhere. If Linux is a widely used and respected choice in IT, what is preventing open-source robotics frameworks to becoming accepted to the same extent in our field?

In our experience, current concerns are mostly centered around:

  • Legal aspects: what are the implications in terms of liability of using OSS in my products, installations, and plants? How do the different open-source licensing schemes work?
  • Economics concerns: can I build a sustainable business model over Open Source? Is my intellectual property at risk?

To help answer these questions and to support potential adopters of OSS in their decision process, Fraunhofer IPA and euRobotics AISBL is offering an event on April 19-20 in Stuttgart, Germany featuring selected speakers providing insight from the technical, economic and legal domains. It is a one-of-a-kind chance to get a comprehensive overview of these aspects and, even more importantly, get answers to your questions and voice your concerns.

For more information, including a detailed program and registration info, please refer to the following webpage.

I look forward to welcoming you in Stuttgart!

Your RIC-EU Program Manager,
Mirko Bordignon

Robotic Product Singulation Testbed

We are excited to post our 50th ROS-I video: Robotic Product Singulation Testbed. This project was demonstrated during the Annual Meeting and is a collaborative development between ABB and SwRI to create a commercial product for warehouse automation. It highlights that, with some optimization, ROS-I applications can exhibit fast cycle times, without sacrificing the intelligence afforded by ROS. A scale demonstration of this technology will be on display next week at MODEX 2016, booth MA 957 (Baldor/ABB).

RIC-Americas Meeting Recap (Part 1 - March 3)

Note: Part 2 of the RIC-Americas Recap will cover events that occurred on March 4.

The ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas annual meeting was held March 3-4 at SwRI's headquarters in San Antonio, TX. March 3 events included an introduction to SwRI, 16 lab demonstrations, a keynote presentation about the ways that ROS is adding intelligence to a five-story tall mobile robotic aircraft depainting system, and an introduction to the ROS-Industrial Consortium. More than 50 people attended representing a cross section of ROS-Industrial stakeholders including automation equipment OEMs, end users, researchers, and government. During the demonstrations, the noise of numerous discussions gave the event a palpable buzz. While still relatively young, we heard a number of attendees remark that ROS-Industrial has momentum. 

Special thanks to our demonstration teams and presenters:

ROS/ROS-I Demonstrations:

  1. Autonomous Vehicle Test Rides. Chris Mentzer, Kris Kozak, Mark Alban, Ed Venator, SwRI.
  2. Large-scale Mobile Robotic Laser Depainting. Clay Flannigan and Michael Rigney, SwRI.
  3. Descartes Constrained Cartesian
    Motion Planner. Christina Gomez, SwRI.
  4. Dual Arm Mobile Manipulation. Andrew
    Sharp, UT Austin NRG.
  5. Euler Mobile Order Fulfillment. Jorge Nicho, SwRI.
  6. FlexGUI. Trygve Thomessen, PPM AS.
  7. Heavy Equipment Simulator (not ROS,
    but still cool). Susan Porter, SwRI.
  8. Human-centered Teleoperation for
    High-precision Tasks aka “Thread the
    Needle”. Karl Kruusamäe, UT Austin
    NRG.
  9. Intrinsic Calibration. Chris Lewis, SwRI.
  10. Package Singulation. Shaun Edwards,
    SwRI.
  11. Ragnar 2D Vision/Replication. Alex
    Goins, SwRI.
  12. Ragnar Demonstration. Preben Hjornet,
    Blue WorkForce.
  13. Robotic Blending. Jonathan Meyer,
    SwRI.
  14. Scan-N-Plan for CAD-Free Painting.
    Michael Blanton, SwRI.
  15. STOMP Free-space Motion Planner. Levi
    Armstrong, SwRI.
  16. Thunder Motion Planner. Dave
    Coleman, CU Boulder.

Presentations:

  • Introduction to SwRI. Paul Evans, SwRI.
  • Space Science. Philip Valek, SwRI.
  • Large Robots Need Smart Controls. Jeremy Zoss, SwRI.
  • Introduction to the ROS-Industrial Consortium. Paul Hvass, SwRI.
Scan-N-Plan for On-The-Fly Robotic Blending Demonstration workcell.

Scan-N-Plan for On-The-Fly Robotic Blending Demonstration workcell.

Explaining the Robotic Blending Process.

Explaining the Robotic Blending Process.

Blue Workforce Ragnar pick and place demonstration.

Blue Workforce Ragnar pick and place demonstration.

Ragnar 2D vision/Replication Demonstration.

Ragnar 2D vision/Replication Demonstration.

Dual arm Mobile Manipulation.

Dual arm Mobile Manipulation.

Package Singulation.

Package Singulation.

 Intrinsic calibration.

 Intrinsic calibration.

Thunder Motion Planner.

Thunder Motion Planner.

FlexGUI Demonstration.

FlexGUI Demonstration.

FLEXGUI runs from any web Browser, even a smart phone!

FLEXGUI runs from any web Browser, even a smart phone!

Discussion about the STOMP Motion Planner.

Discussion about the STOMP Motion Planner.

Close up of the sTOMP Planner.

Close up of the sTOMP Planner.

Human-Centered Teleoperation for High Precision Tasks: Note the voice and gesture interface.

Human-Centered Teleoperation for High Precision Tasks: Note the voice and gesture interface.

Another view of the Teleoperation Demo.

Another view of the Teleoperation Demo.

Scan-N-Plan for CAD-Free Painting.

Scan-N-Plan for CAD-Free Painting.

Euler Mobile manipulator Demonstration.

Euler Mobile manipulator Demonstration.

Participants took turns riding in SwRI's ROS-enabled autonomous vehicles.

Participants took turns riding in SwRI's ROS-enabled autonomous vehicles.

One vehicle navigated a slalom course while the other drove over a mix of paved and off-road Terrain.

One vehicle navigated a slalom course while the other drove over a mix of paved and off-road Terrain.

ROS-Industrial Training April 6-8, 2016

Southwest Research Institute is hosting a ROS-Industrial Training Class April 6 – 8, 2016 in San Antonio Texas.

The classroom portion is similar to the training held last year with the same curriculum and lab option for Descartes; a more detailed agenda can be found at the ROS-I website. Please bring a laptop to the class with the ROS-I training Virtual Machine pre-installed . This class is geared toward individuals with a programming background who seek to learn to compose their own ROS nodes. Day 1 will focus on basic/introductory ROS concepts. Day 2 will examine motion planning using MoveIt! as well as the Descartes planner and Perception concepts. Day 3 offers a lab programming exercise (with a choice of):
• Simple Perception Lab
• Simple MoveIt! Application
• Simple Descartes Application.
• Pick and Place Application
Registration is now open: http://rosindustrial.org/training-registration
Book your hotel by March 22 to receive the discounted room rate! Details can be found at the event website.

Google Summer of Code 2016

This Summer, ROS-Industrial will be participating in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) under the Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) umbrella.

GSoC is a great way for students to participate in open source projects and get paid. It's also a great opportunity to get some work done on an open source project and grow our community. ROS-Industrial has had several successful GSoC projects in the past and many of the students continue on as members of our community.

If you are an interested student, or know of one, please check out our idea page: http://wiki.osrfoundation.org/gsoc16.

Students have until March 25, 2016, to submit proposals for these ideas to GSoC. More details on the timeline can be found here: https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/timeline .

I encourage students who wish to participate to reach out (swri-ros-pkg-dev@googlegroups.com) with any questions or ideas they might have about suggested projects. For GSoC rules, check out: https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/rules

Looking forward to being overloaded with proposals...

-Shaun Edwards

FlexGui by PPM AS offers an open-source intuitive interface for robot control

Following the announcement made at the last RIC-EU Members Meeting, PPM AS released a significant part of its FlexGui software package as open-source. FlexGui, which is now part of the ROS-Industrial project, is an easy-to-configure interface originally developed for the control panel of Nachi robots. Its latest release runs on any browser-equipped device, including industrial PCs and tablets, making it also suitable for remote supervision. ROS-integration makes it now possible to control through FlexGui the wide range of platforms supported by ROS, and its factory designer functionality makes it appealing for production scenarios rich of sensors and other networked devices, such as those envisioned by the Industrie 4.0 initiative.

In case you missed the FlexGui demo at the last RIC-EU event held at Fraunhofer IPA in January, you can hear the presentation by Laszlo Nagy from PPM AS given during the last Community Meeting. Click here for the recording. PPM AS will be present at the RIC-Americas Annual Meeting.

NIST Launches National Competition to Make Robots More Agile

Cross-Posted from NIST Intelligent Systems Division Press Release

Manufacturers, robot suppliers and researchers, here’s your chance to get in on the ground floor of an upcoming national competition intended to help make robots handier and nimbler performers on the factory floor.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is launching ARIAC—the Agile Robotics for Industrial Automation Competition, a joint effort with the IEEE Conference on Automation Science and Engineering. Now in the planning stages, this first-ever, simulation-based competition aims to inspire applications of the latest advances in artificial intelligence and other technologies to solve the challenge of making robots more capable, versatile and collaborative, as well as easier to program.

Click to continue reading on the NIST website.

Editor's note: We encourage contestants to utilize ROS-Industrial open source software for their development efforts. In particular, the Industrial MoveIt! package may be helpful for motion planning.

Robot challenged to demonstrate its dexterity on NIST test artifacts. The new ARIAC competition will focus on agility—how well robots can perform a diverse set of tasks and how quickly they can be re-tasked.Photo Credit: NIST/D. Russell

Robot challenged to demonstrate its dexterity on NIST test artifacts. The new ARIAC competition will focus on agility—how well robots can perform a diverse set of tasks and how quickly they can be re-tasked.Photo Credit: NIST/D. Russell

ROS Bridges for Common Field Busses

Hardware interfaces are particularly important for any future integration of ROS-I with production systems. During 2015, we noted four new repositories emerged that span the range of prominent industrial field busses:

• CANOPEN™: CANOPEN is a fieldbus with origins in automotive applications (CAN), but applied to automation. We are grateful for the efforts of Mathias Lüdtke and Florian Weisshardt from Fraunhofer IPA for the ros_ canopen package.
• EtherNet/IP™: EtherNet/IP is an Ethernet-based real-time communication bus standard that was created by Allen-Bradley (Rockwell Automation). Thank you ClearPath Robotics for developing and releasing a ROS driver for EtherNet/IP.
• EtherCAT™: Probably the first fieldbus supported in ROS for the PR2, EtherCAT is an Ethernet-based realtime communication bus standard that was created by Beckhoff Automation. We appreciate Intermodalics for maintaining the EtherCAT package for ROS.
• PROFINET™: PROFINET, an open automation standard and part of IEC 61158 is fully compatible with all the features of standard Ethernet, and also capable of real-time performance. We recognize the efforts of package developer Frantisek Durovsky from the Technical University of Kosice in Slovakia along with his mentor Shaun Edwards (SwRI), the financial support of Google Summer of Code program, and technical support from Siemens.

Detailed Schedule for the ROS-I Consortium Americas Meeting Released

For full details visit the event page.

Register now!

Thursday, March 3 (Public):

Time Description Host/Presentor
1220 Shuttle Pickup at Hyatt Regency Hill Country
1230-1300 Registration
1300-1315 Welcome – Intro to SwRI Paul Hvass
1315-1345 Lab Tour: Space Science Space Science Staff
1345-1415 Lab Tour: Unmanned Systems Chris Mentzer
1415-1445 Lab Tour: HAT and Coating Removal Laser Lab Clay Flannigan, Mike Rigney
1445-1600 Lab Tour: Robotics and Automation, Simulation... Clay Flannigan, Susan Porter
1600-1630 Keynote: Design of Five Story Laser Depainting... Jeremy Zoss
1630-1700 Consortium Overview and Wrap up Paul Hvass
1715 Shuttles Depart for Dinner: Boiler House


Friday, March 4 (Members Only):

Time Description Host/Presenter
0800 Shuttle Pickup at Hyatt Regency Hill Country
0800-0830 Registration, Light Breakfast
0830-0845 Welcome and Introductions Paul Hvass
0845-0920 RIC-Americas Highlights and Upcoming Events Paul Hvass, Shaun Edwards
0920-0940 RIC-Europe: Rapid Growth Mirko Bordignon
0940-1000 Is it Time for RIC-Asia? Nicholas Yeo Chang Yee
1000-1030 Break
1030-1130 RIC Strategy Round Tables – NNMI, App Store... Moderator - Paul Hvass
1130-1200 ROS 2.0 Real Time Capabilities, Q+A Morgan Quigley
1200-1230 Lunch
1230-1300 Lunch Keynote: PlusOne Robotics Erik Nieves
1300-1400 Focused Technical Projects Paul Hvass
1400-1415 Break
1415-1515 ROS-I Technical Roadmapping Round Tables Clay Flannigan
1515-1530 Action Items/Wrap up Paul Hvass
1530 Shuttles Direct to Airport and Hotel